Buy Essay Online Safely from a Reputable Service

Buy Essay Online Safe to get you best grades Buy essay online safe from a reliable paper writing service and ensure you are able to submit top-notch papers.

Despite concerns about whether one can buy essay online safe, students increasingly turn to the internet to get their assignments done. While more students are using ghostwriters to assist with their essays, there is some concern that they may be discovered.

This guide will show you how to buy papers online safely and honestly to get rid. You’ll learn how secure it is to get essay writing services from the most outstanding experts.

It’s not as simple as it sounds to locate a paper writing service you may put your faith in. Even if there are many services available, some of them may not be real or legal!

Getting assistance with your academic papers is a given. If you’re looking for a high-quality, custom essay that’s legal and safe, you may get it from an internet service. Professional writers employed by these organizations are dedicated to ensuring that your life as an aspiring student is not made more difficult by the task.

While we have the most outstanding service to buy essay online safe and at affordable prices, we think it makes more sense to give you some advice on how to do it correctly.

According to a recent study, at least one-third of college students have utilized essay writing services. Because of this, students want to know if they can get essay help online safely and if it is possible to buy essays online safely.

In light of this, authorities have discouraged internet essay writing services from operating. As a result, it’s a challenge for students, who are generally unaware of the proper procedure. Learn how to buy essays online correctly by reading our article.

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Is It Safe to Buy Essays Online? Tips to avoid being Caught off-guard!

Online buying of essays is secure if they are created from scratch by a professional with extensive experience in the field. Your essay’s security depends on where you purchased it and how you intend to utilize it. A professional ghostwriter’s work is guaranteed to be legal and safe. You run the danger of getting caught using essay writing services if you buy papers from open databases.

If you purchase essays from companies that resell previously produced essays, you run the risk of receiving papers that are plagiarized to an extreme degree. They are resold to many individuals online after being copied from other sources.

Turnitin will flag any essay purchased from a public database as plagiarized. Our analysis of whether Turnitin flags essays purchased online showed that they would be recognized for plagiarism.

How to Buy Essays Online Safe Without Fear

  1. Keep your personal information private.

    Most students are aware of the importance of protecting their online identities. On the other hand, many people make the error of disclosing small facts about their educational background.

    As most assignments include instructions that may be unique to one’s educational institution, this is understandable.

    Students’ orders may easily be traced back to them because of this method.

  2. Keep your school’s identity a secret at all times.

    In talks with your writers, you should avoid mentioning personal information about your institution or the courses you are enrolled in.

    Additionally, you must ensure that all documents you send with the business are free of any identifying information about you, such as your school, instructor, or internship.

  3. Avoid using public networks and the Internet.

    A digital footprint is left by everything you do online. By keeping track of your interactions with the essay writing service, anyone who wants to locate you may. Considering this subject’s attention from the government, this should be a cause for alarm.

    To keep your online activity private, there are numerous options available. The most straightforward method is to use a virtual private network (VPN).

    Your computer and other gadgets will be unable to determine your actual IP address due to using this service. You can even make it appear like you’re on a different continent by hiding your exact location.

Is it Illegal to Buy Essays Online Safe?

While hiring someone to write an essay for you is now permissible, you should be aware that the ethics of doing so will depend on the assistance you received from the person you hired. Currently, governments are considering legislation to combat the practice of “contract cheating.”

It will be tough for university officials to detect students who buy essays for their tasks, no matter the laws or regulations.

Hiring someone else to write the entire essay will cost more; however, the basic idea remains the same.

Going to someone for aid really does depend on the kind of assistance you receive. If you obtain high-quality papers, you will benefit.

Your writing should be checked by someone else regularly for grammar and spelling issues, as well as redundant phrases or sentences. Online homework writing help of this caliber is well worth taking advantage of.

Can You Be Caught Buying an Essay Online?

As long as you have an expert essay writer handle your work and the document is yours, you can’t be accused of using essay writing services. Additionally, you need to update the paper to include your names on the title page and the authorship part of the file information. In this method, you will personalize the paper and make it impossible to tell that it was purchased.

There is, however, a chance that the individual who requested the essay could be breaking the rules. Academically dishonest is a term that has been used to describe it.

But is it truly dishonesty? It’s possible, but it all depends on how you present your work in class.

An essay that has been written and the research done by someone else but has your name on it is considered academic dishonesty.

Each person assigned to read your honors thesis will have ideas that can be incorporated into the final product.

On the other hand, hiring a professional to write your full essay is a bad idea.

It’s a bad idea to try and pass off someone else’s work as your own.

A commercial article, such as one that you publish to a newsletter or a website, is best served by crediting the author appropriately.

How to buy essay online safe without being caught

You must read and understand the paper, customize it, and change the authorship of the file if you want to buy essay online safe without getting detected. Make sure to show the paper as yours. What is wrong is to say that someone else’s essay is yours. To avoid plagiarism while purchasing a paper online, verify that it is original and that you have the copyright to it.

You can buy essays online if you get to keep the work that a homework help service gives you, so it is safe to do so.

This basic rule applies to all aspects of life, including business, education, and the sciences. That being said, it is not prohibited to submit an essay that you helped write, and it’s all up to you and your personal preferences in terms of time management and priorities.

College students, especially those involved in both academics and employment, are likely to require assistance for various reasons. It is pretty OK for these students to seek help to achieve their goal of graduating.

There is tremendous work, time, and attention required to earn a degree. As a result, hire a graduate to write your essays as well. For example, it is best to engage an expert essay writer who has a degree in that field.

Do not hesitate to ask for assistance when you need it most. Paying someone to write your essay is not illegal in most countries, but it is regarded as unethical.

 

Buy Essay Online Safe: Order an Excellent Essay today

Is it possible to pay someone to write an essay?

Paying for an essay online is safe because it is a common practice.
As a student, you have a responsibility to weigh the benefits and drawbacks of employing essay writing services that charge by the page. Purchasing essays has grown more and more commonplace among students.

Ghostwriting is common for many high-profile figures, including actors, athletes, politicians, and business people.

Because of this, education has been transformed into a business that facilitates the trade of commodities and services between customers and sellers to make a profit. In other words, if you pay a lot of money, you should expect to obtain good grades.

On the other hand, cheating and plagiarism have existed in various forms for many generations.

There was a time when students had the option of enlisting the help of a fellow student or submitting a paper that had already been completed by someone else.

Because of the advances in technology, students are now submitting papers that contain plagiarized material that they have copied and pasted from other sources. Special software has been created to identify this type of plagiarism as the problem grows.

Another benefit of paying for essays is that these papers are written by professionals, which means that the issue of whether paying for essays works is answered in the affirmative. It does, in fact.

Are there any Legit Paper Writing Services?

Yes, they are available. ReliablePapers.com is a legitimate essay writing service that has received hundreds of excellent reviews from students in the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Canadian provinces. You should choose this firm if you want a high-quality college paper. ReliablePapers is a company that provides plagiarism-free papers on time and with an average grade of 90 percent on the first attempt.

Why Reliablepapers.com is the safest place to buy essays

We’ve done a lot of homework, so we’ve got a lot of knowledge to draw from. We’ve created a user-friendly website with a cutting-edge interface to help you save time.

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Don’t be hesitant to contact us if you’re in need of a reliable writing service. Buying essays online is risk-free if you have the correct information and conduct thorough research on reputable essay writing providers.

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Describe Childhood Residency

Describe Childhood Residency

A: Disadvantaged Consideration
Should you be considered a disadvantaged applicant? Refer specifically to social, economic, and or educational factors when making a determination.

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2021-22 ADEA AADSAS Application Update

The 2021-22 ADEA AADSAS® (ADEA Associated American Dental School Application Service) application opens on May 11 for applicants to begin creating their applications. Applicants will be able to submit their applications for consideration starting June 1. Changes for the upcoming cycle include:

  • “Document” Tab in Program Materials. Dental schools might request additional documents in the application. Applicants can upload up to three additional documents.
  • Letters of Evaluation. The composite letter/packet is now counted as one instead of three. Applicants can provide four total letters, regardless of the status of the composite/committee letter.
  • Disadvantaged Question. The “Personal Information” section has been reordered and revised to reflect the updates below. Note: The three questions have been removed. If dental schools decide to still collect this information, they can add the questions manually to their “Program Materials” section. Here are the changes:
    • The categories have been reordered on this page to read as follows:
      • Disadvantage Consideration
      • Family Situation (U.S. Applicants Only)
      • Childhood Residency
      • High School Situation
      • Relatives in Dentistry
    • The following questions have been removed:
      • In the “Childhood Residency” section:
        • In what country did you spend the majority of your life from birth to age 18?
        • In what state did you spend the majority of your life from birth to age 18?
        • Do you feel that the area you grew up in was medically underserved?
    • In the “High School Situation” section:
      • Did the high school you attended have many students eligible for free or reduced-price lunches?

Read Description of Childhood Residency Essay Example

Just like the vast majority of Americans, I had assumed there were only three levels of education in the United States until taking this course. When I realized there were six sections, the essential distinction became clear. I have had the privilege of experiencing life in every corner of the diamond, with the exception of the very top, thanks to the many places I have called home throughout the course of my lifetime. It was also fascinating to me to be able to experience so many tiers of our society’s social stratification in my short 23 years of existence. The American upper class is the most visible and widely portrayed social stratum, which attracts many foreigners to our country but is also the most elitist and unreachable. Ultimately, there are restrictions that I and many others are born with that prohibit us from progressing to higher levels, despite the fact that I was granted access to many of these experiences. The “American dream” that so many individuals in our society have is out of grasp for many people simply because of the circumstances into which they were born.

My early years, from around age three to about age nine, were spent in a modest middle-class home. Victorville, in the southern part of California, was my home. Many people’s concept of the perfect home would look something like this: two parents, two children, a three-bedroom house in a pleasant neighborhood. We never went hungry or even worried about it, the utilities were never a problem, and we felt completely secure in our surroundings. Then, when I was 9 years old, my mother and I lost our housing and were forced to live in our car, a storage unit, and eventually, the streets. For the ensuing years, we were constantly on the move; as a result, I lost an entire year of school; and my family and I often went without adequate nutrition or shelter, but I was too young to understand the gravity of our situation. My mother handed me up to my father and stepmother when I was 12 years old. They were residents of the violent metropolitan neighborhood of Bassett. For the second time in my life, I shared a three-bedroom home with a large family, this time including my foster sisters, step-sister, and two more step-siblings. After being removed from school for disciplinary reasons, I was readmitted and allowed to skip a grade, but the schools I attended lacked adequate resources and administration. There were no extracurriculars or tools to help us get ready for life after high school. I went to live with my grandma in Upland, California, when I turned 18. She was fortunate enough to find a home on the affluent side of town, at the top of the foothill. The three-bedroom house was plenty spacious for only Mom, my grandfather, and me. Every day I knew I would have something to eat because of how safe the neighborhood was and how strictly the HOA rules were enforced. For the first time in my life, I had my very own room, complete with a bed that didn’t require me to hold up my feet, reliable transportation, and a variety of useful tools. Last but not least, when I was twenty years old, I relocated once more to be closer to my ailing father. For someone working two minimum-wage jobs, going to school full-time, and caring for a disabled family member, our subsidized two-bedroom apartment in an industrial area was surprisingly reasonable. We had numerous fights with case managers and the SSA over his benefits. It makes sense to have more than just three simple levels, as these details convey the experience of moving through different social or economic classes over the course of a single lifetime. It’s likely that there are more than six tiers of American society, but it would be impossible to classify them all.

My socioeconomic background includes lower middle, underclass, working poor, upper middle, and finally working class. Before reaching the age of 20, I had several class transitions. I am able to make this distinction because there is one social tier that I have never belonged to: the upper classes. The lack of resources and the fact that I did not come from a privileged background are two of the primary factors that have kept me from achieving success. I suppose you could call the fact that my grandparents have very few financial worries a sign of prosperity, but that’s not the case. This is because they do not possess a sizable amount of wealth and property. It’s not “long” money; rather, it’s money that can be passed down through generations. When they pass away, wealthy people typically leave their properties and interests to their children or other relatives. The longer these items are kept in the family, the more valuable they become.

As a result of the estate’s longevity and weight, the family is safeguarded from financial insecurity. In the United States, wealth is generally “generational,” meaning it is passed down through families, which means the wealthy and powerful are able to decide who gets access to their resources. Relatedly, white people in the United States are disproportionately wealthy. Our class looked at a list of the top ten wealthiest people in the United States, and they were all white guys. In the United States, racial or ethnic background often determines how well a family does financially. This is due to the fact that white men were the only ones who benefited from the conquest and exploitation of America’s indigenous peoples in the outset, while people of color bore the brunt of the nation’s construction and thereafter suffered under its neglect and abuse.
Although the upper-class society is frequently the focus of media attention, its members make up a relatively tiny percentage of the U.S. population as a whole. In the past, I undervalued the magnitude of the wealth disparity between the affluent and everyone else. In the 1980s, the disparity widened as the population grew and the demand for manufacturing went up, but the majority of the increased earnings went to the elite instead of the general public. Federal tax policies developed in the 2000s to assist the upper class and help them keep their already enormous wealth led to a widening of the divide.

As was previously noted, most people’s socioeconomic standing is heavily influenced by their ethnicity and/or race. These roles are best illustrated by the American Ethnic Hierarchy, which places European-American Protestants at the top, followed by European-American Catholics, Jewish people, and the vast majority of Asians, and finally African-Americans, Latinx, Native Americans, and a small number of Asians at the bottom. These brackets approximate the likelihood of upward mobility in the United States when race is taken into account as a barrier. Those at the top aren’t any better than anyone else; they just have more resources to use in their systematic oppression of those they perceive to be beneath them since their predecessors have believed they are superior to everyone else from the beginning of time. The relative positions in this hierarchy have altered little throughout time, but there have been some positive shifts as a result of progress against prejudice and discrimination. For instance, the second tier, which includes the Irish, Italians, Jews, etc., is no longer discriminated against on the basis of ethnicity. This is because they are better able to artistically assimilate into the dominant culture than the third tier. The third layer consists of people of color who were forcibly transported from their homeland, either as slaves or indentured workers, and expected to assimilate into a culture that was not designed for them. The lower rung still suffers today from these disadvantages. Unfortunately, non-white people have never had access to the same level of economic opportunity, support, or control that white people have enjoyed. They weren’t only dealt a terrible hand, but they were also thrown into a game they didn’t know how to play with the odds stacked against them.

Though I only make up half of the race, I still face challenges associated with being black, such as being born into a poor family. While you’re born into poverty, it can feel like you’re entering the game in the fourth quarter when the opposing side is up 20 to 0. I came from a low-income family that relied on welfare and had neither the means nor the education to break the cycle. Because they had never figured out how to do it themselves, my family was unable to advise me on my pursuit of further education or professional chances. My high school did not place as much emphasis on preparing us for college or helping us choose a career path as it did on reducing violence and teen pregnancies. I lucked fortunate and got a helping hand from a stranger when I really needed it. However, many of the pupils, who were disproportionately Latinx and Black, did not share this experience. The vast majority of my contemporaries had children at an early age, worked in factories to make ends meet, relied on various forms of government aid and support, or enlisted in the armed forces because it seemed like their only other choice.

Despite the fact that there is still a great deal to learn about the inner workings of our class system and its effects on individual lives, it is abundantly evident that it is in dire need of change. The economic and social climate in our country is deteriorating. The working class is being hit hard, and the poor are growing in number. The 1%’s growing alienation from the rest of society is choking the economy. Sooner or later, the poor will outnumber the wealthy, and those at the top will be the only ones left.

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Discussion: Everyday Use

Discussion: Everyday Use
ORDER NOW FOR ORIGINAL AN ORIGINAL PAPER ASSIGNMENT:  Discussion: Everyday Use
Discussion: Everyday Use
The requirements for this essay are:
1. 500-600 words; 5-paragraph structure (can have more than five).
2. Your idea about the story itself—the value of the story (at least a paragraph)
3. How it applies to life in general (at least a paragraph)
4. How it applies to you. Write about an item that is important to you, one that has been passed down to you or one that you hope will be or an item that you have that you will plan to pass down to someone (at least a paragraph). .
5. Be sure to supply
a. A parenthetical reference
b. A Works Cited
I will wait for her in the yard that Maggie and I made so clean and wavy yesterday afternoon. A yard like this is more comfortable than most people know. It is not just a yard. It is like an extended living room. When the hard clay is swept clean as a floor and the fine sand around the edges lined with tiny, irregular grooves, anyone can come and sit and look up into the elm tree and wait for the breezes that never come inside the house.

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Maggie will be nervous until after her sister goes: she will stand hopelessly in corners, homely and ashamed of the burn scars down her arms and legs, eying her sister with a mixture of envy and awe. She thinks her sister has held life always in the palm of one hand, that “no” is a word the world never learned to say to her.
Discussion: Everyday Use
You’ve no doubt seen those TV shows where the child who has “made it” is confronted, as a surprise, by her own mother and father, tottering in weakly from backstage. (A pleasant surprise, of course: What would they do if parent and child came on the show only to curse out and insult each other?) On TV mother and child embrace and smile into each other’s faces. Sometimes the mother and father weep, the child wraps them in her arms and leans across the table to tell how she would not have made it without their help. I have seen these programs.
Sometimes I dream a dream in which Dee and I are suddenly brought together on a TV program of this sort. Out of a dark and soft.seated limousine I am ushered into a bright room filled with many people. There I meet a smiling, gray, sporty man like Johnny Carson who shakes my hand and tells me what a fine girl I have. Then we are on the stage and Dee is embracing me with tears in her eyes. She pins on my dress a large orchid, even though she has told me once that she thinks orchids are tacky flowers.
In real life I am a large, big.boned woman with rough, man.working hands. In the winter I wear flannel nightgowns to bed and overalls dur.ing the day. I can kill and clean a hog as mercilessly as a man. My fat keeps me hot in zero weather. I can work outside all day, breaking ice to get water for washing; I can eat pork liver cooked over the open fire minutes after it comes steaming from the hog. One winter I knocked a bull calf straight in the brain between the eyes with a sledge hammer and had the meat hung up to chill before nightfall. But of course all this does not show on television. I am the way my daughter would want me to be: a hundred pounds lighter, my skin like an uncooked barley pancake. My hair glistens in the hot bright lights. Johnny Carson has much to do to keep up with my quick and witty tongue.
But that is a mistake. I know even before I wake up. Who ever knew a Johnson with a quick tongue? Who can even imagine me looking a strange white man in the eye? It seems to me I have talked to them always with one foot raised in flight, with my head fumed in whichever way is farthest from them. Dee, though. She would always look anyone in the eye. Hesitation was no part of her nature.
“How do I look, Mama?” Maggie says, showing just enough of her thin body enveloped in pink skirt and red blouse for me to know she’s there, almost hidden by the door.
“Come out into the yard,” I say.
Have you ever seen a lame animal, perhaps a dog run over by some careless person rich enough to own a car, sidle up to someone who is ignorant enough to be kind to him? That is the way my Maggie walks. She has been like this, chin on chest, eyes on ground, feet in shuffle, ever since the fire that burned the other house to the ground.
Dee is lighter than Maggie, with nicer hair and a fuller figure. She’s a woman now, though sometimes I forget. How long ago was it that the other house burned? Ten, twelve years? Sometimes I can still hear the flames and feel Maggie’s arms sticking to me, her hair smoking and her dress falling off her in little black papery flakes. Her eyes seemed stretched open, blazed open by the flames reflected in them. And Dee. I see her standing off under the sweet gum tree she used to dig gum out of; a look of concentration on her face as she watched the last dingy gray board of the house fall in toward the red.hot brick chimney. Why don’t you do a dance around the ashes? I’d wanted to ask her. She had hated the house that much.
I used to think she hated Maggie, too. But that was before we raised money, the church and me, to send her to Augusta to school. She used to read to us without pity; forcing words, lies, other folks’ habits, whole lives upon us two, sitting trapped and ignorant underneath her voice. She washed us in a river of make.believe, burned us with a lot of knowl edge we didn’t necessarily need to know. Pressed us to her with the serf’ ous way she read, to shove us away at just the moment, like dimwits, we seemed about to understand.
Discussion: Everyday Use
Discussion: Everyday Use
Dee wanted nice things. A yellow organdy dress to wear to her grad.uation from high school; black pumps to match a green suit she’d made from an old suit somebody gave me. She was determined to stare down any disaster in her efforts. Her eyelids would not flicker for minutes at a time. Often I fought off the temptation to shake her. At sixteen she had a style of her own: and knew what style was.
I never had an education myself. After second grade the school was closed down. Don’t ask my why: in 1927 colored asked fewer questions than they do now. Sometimes Maggie reads to me. She stumbles along good.naturedly but can’t see well. She knows she is not bright. Like good looks and money, quickness passes her by. She will marry John Thomas (who has mossy teeth in an earnest face) and then I’ll be free to sit here and I guess just sing church songs to myself. Although I never was a good singer. Never could carry a tune. I was always better at a man’s job. I used to love to milk till I was hooked in the side in ’49. Cows are soothing and slow and don’t bother you, unless you try to milk them the wrong way.
I have deliberately turned my back on the house. It is three rooms, just like the one that burned, except the roof is tin; they don’t make shingle roofs any more. There are no real windows, just some holes cut in the sides, like the portholes in a ship, but not round and not square, with rawhide holding the shutters up on the outside. This house is in a pasture, too, like the other one. No doubt when Dee sees it she will want to tear it down. She wrote me once that no matter where we “choose” to live, she will manage to come see us. But she will never bring her friends. Maggie and I thought about this and Maggie asked me, “Mama, when did Dee ever have any friends?”
She had a few. Furtive boys in pink shirts hanging about on washday after school. Nervous girls who never laughed. Impressed with her they worshiped the well.turned phrase, the cute shape, the scalding humor that erupted like bubbles in Iye. She read to them.
When she was courting Jimmy T she didn’t have much time to pay to us, but turned all her faultfinding power on him. He flew to marry a cheap city girl from a family of ignorant flashy people. She hardly had time to recompose herself.
When she comes I will meet—but there they are!
Maggie attempts to make a dash for the house, in her shuffling way, but I stay her with my hand. “Come back here, ” I say. And she stops and tries to dig a well in the sand with her toe.
It is hard to see them clearly through the strong sun. But even the first glimpse of leg out of the car tells me it is Dee. Her feet were always neat.looking, as if God himself had shaped them with a certain style. From the other side of the car comes a short, stocky man. Hair is all over his head a foot long and hanging from his chin like a kinky mule tail. I hear Maggie suck in her breath. “Uhnnnh, ” is what it sounds like. Like when you see the wriggling end of a snake just in front of your foot on the road. “Uhnnnh.”
Dee next. A dress down to the ground, in this hot weather. A dress so loud it hurts my eyes. There are yellows and oranges enough to throw back the light of the sun. I feel my whole face warming from the heat waves it throws out. Earrings gold, too, and hanging down to her shoul.ders. Bracelets dangling and making noises when she moves her arm up to shake the folds of the dress out of her armpits. The dress is loose and flows, and as she walks closer, I like it. I hear Maggie go “Uhnnnh” again. It is her sister’s hair. It stands straight up like the wool on a sheep. It is black as night and around the edges are two long pigtails that rope about like small lizards disappearing behind her ears.
Discussion: Everyday Use
Discussion: Everyday Use
“Wa.su.zo.Tean.o!” she says, coming on in that gliding way the dress makes her move. The short stocky fellow with the hair to his navel is all grinning and he follows up with “Asalamalakim, my mother and sister!” He moves to hug Maggie but she falls back, right up against the back of my chair. I feel her trembling there and when I look up I see the perspiration falling off her chin.
“Don’t get up,” says Dee. Since I am stout it takes something of a push. You can see me trying to move a second or two before I make it. She turns, showing white heels through her sandals, and goes back to the car. Out she peeks next with a Polaroid. She stoops down quickly and lines up picture after picture of me sitting there in front of the house with Maggie cowering behind me. She never takes a shot without mak’ ing sure the house is included. When a cow comes nibbling around the edge of the yard she snaps it and me and Maggie and the house. Then she puts the Polaroid in the back seat of the car, and comes up and kisses me on the forehead.
Meanwhile Asalamalakim is going through motions with Maggie’s hand. Maggie’s hand is as limp as a fish, and probably as cold, despite the sweat, and she keeps trying to pull it back. It looks like Asalamalakim wants to shake hands but wants to do it fancy. Or maybe he don’t know how people shake hands. Anyhow, he soon gives up on Maggie.
“Well,” I say. “Dee.”
“No, Mama,” she says. “Not ‘Dee,’ Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo!”
“What happened to ‘Dee’?” I wanted to know.
“She’s dead,” Wangero said. “I couldn’t bear it any longer, being named after the people who oppress me.”
“You know as well as me you was named after your aunt Dicie,” I said. Dicie is my sister. She named Dee. We called her “Big Dee” after Dee was born.
“But who was she named after?” asked Wangero.
“I guess after Grandma Dee,” I said.
“And who was she named after?” asked Wangero.
“Her mother,” I said, and saw Wangero was getting tired. “That’s about as far back as I can trace it,” I said. Though, in fact, I probably could have carried it back beyond the Civil War through the branches.
“Well,” said Asalamalakim, “there you are.”
“Uhnnnh,” I heard Maggie say.
“There I was not,” I said, “before ‘Dicie’ cropped up in our family, so why should I try to trace it that far back?”
He just stood there grinning, looking down on me like somebody inspecting a Model A car. Every once in a while he and Wangero sent eye signals over my head.
Discussion: Everyday Use
Discussion: Everyday Use
“How do you pronounce this name?” I asked.
“You don’t have to call me by it if you don’t want to,” said Wangero.
“Why shouldn’t 1?” I asked. “If that’s what you want us to call you, we’ll call you.”
.
“I know it might sound awkward at first,” said Wangero.
“I’ll get used to it,” I said. “Ream it out again.”
Well, soon we got the name out of the way. Asalamalakim had a name twice as long and three times as hard. After I tripped over it two or three times he told me to just call him Hakim.a.barber. I wanted to ask him was he a barber, but I didn’t really think he was, so I didn’t ask.
“You must belong to those beef.cattle peoples down the road,” I said. They said “Asalamalakim” when they met you, too, but they didn’t shake hands. Always too busy: feeding the cattle, fixing the fences, putting up salt.lick shelters, throwing down hay. When the white folks poisoned some of the herd the men stayed up all night with rifles in their hands. I walked a mile and a half just to see the sight.
Hakim.a.barber said, “I accept some of their doctrines, but farming and raising cattle is not my style.” (They didn’t tell me, and I didn’t ask, whether Wangero (Dee) had really gone and married him.)
We sat down to eat and right away he said he didn’t eat collards and pork was unclean. Wangero, though, went on through the chitlins and com bread, the greens and everything else. She talked a blue streak over the sweet potatoes. Everything delighted her. Even the fact that we still used the benches her daddy made for the table when we couldn’t effort to buy chairs.
Discussion: Everyday Use
Discussion: Everyday Use
“Oh, Mama!” she cried. Then turned to Hakim.a.barber. “I never knew how lovely these benches are. You can feel the rump prints,” she said, running her hands underneath her and along the bench. Then she gave a sigh and her hand closed over Grandma Dee’s butter dish. “That’s it!” she said. “I knew there was something I wanted to ask you if I could have.” She jumped up from the table and went over in the corner where the churn stood, the milk in it crabber by now. She looked at the churn and looked at it.
“This churn top is what I need,” she said. “Didn’t Uncle Buddy whittle it out of a tree you all used to have?”
“Yes,” I said.
“Un huh,” she said happily. “And I want the dasher, too.”
“Uncle Buddy whittle that, too?” asked the barber.
Dee (Wangero) looked up at me.
“Aunt Dee’s first husband whittled the dash,” said Maggie so low you almost couldn’t hear her. “His name was Henry, but they called him Stash.”
“Maggie’s brain is like an elephant’s,” Wangero said, laughing. “I can use the chute top as a centerpiece for the alcove table,” she said, sliding a plate over the chute, “and I’ll think of something artistic to do with the dasher.”
When she finished wrapping the dasher the handle stuck out. I took it for a moment in my hands. You didn’t even have to look close to see where hands pushing the dasher up and down to make butter had left a kind of sink in the wood. In fact, there were a lot of small sinks; you could see where thumbs and fingers had sunk into the wood. It was beautiful light yellow wood, from a tree that grew in the yard where Big Dee and Stash had lived.
After dinner Dee (Wangero) went to the trunk at the foot of my bed and started rifling through it. Maggie hung back in the kitchen over the dishpan. Out came Wangero with two quilts. They had been pieced by Grandma Dee and then Big Dee and me had hung them on the quilt ftames on the ftont porch and quilted them. One was in the Lone Stat pattetn. The other was Walk Around the Mountain. In both of them were scraps of dresses Grandma Dee had wotn fifty and more years ago. Bits and pieces of Grandpa Jattell’s Paisley shirts. And one teeny faded blue piece, about the size of a penny matchbox, that was from Great Grandpa Ezra’s unifotm that he wore in the Civil War.
“Mama,” Wangro said sweet as a bird. “Can I have these old quilts?”
I heard something fall in the kitchen, and a minute later the kitchen door slammed.
“Why don’t you take one or two of the others?” I asked. “These old things was just done by me and Big Dee from some tops your grandma pieced before she died.”
Discussion: Everyday Use
Discussion: Everyday Use
“No,” said Wangero. “I don’t want those. They are stitched around the borders by machine.”
“That’ll make them last better,” I said.
“That’s not the point,” said Wangero. “These are all pieces of dresses Grandma used to wear. She did all this stitching by hand. Imag’ ine!” She held the quilts securely in her atms, stroking them.
“Some of the pieces, like those lavender ones, come ftom old clothes her mother handed down to her,” I said, moving up to touch the quilts. Dee (Wangero) moved back just enough so that I couldn’t reach the quilts. They already belonged to her.
“Imagine!” she breathed again, clutching them closely to her bosom.
“The ttuth is,” I said, “I promised to give them quilts to Maggie, for when she matties John Thomas.”
She gasped like a bee had stung her.
Discussion: Everyday Use
Discussion: Everyday Use
“Maggie can’t appreciate these quilts!” she said. “She’d probably be backward enough to put them to everyday use.”
“I reckon she would,” I said. “God knows I been saving ’em for long enough with nobody using ’em. I hope she will!” I didn’t want to bring up how I had offered Dee (Wangero) a quilt when she went away to college. Then she had told they were old~fashioned, out of style.
“But they’re priceless!” she was saying now, furiously; for she has a temper. “Maggie would put them on the bed and in five years they’d be in rags. Less than that!”
“She can always make some more,” I said. “Maggie knows how to quilt.”
Dee (Wangero) looked at me with hatred. “You just will not under.stand. The point is these quilts, these quilts!”
“Well,” I said, stumped. “What would you do with them7”
“Hang them,” she said. As if that was the only thing you could do with quilts.
Maggie by now was standing in the door. I could almost hear the sound her feet made as they scraped over each other.
“She can have them, Mama,” she said, like somebody used to never winning anything, or having anything reserved for her. “I can ‘member Grandma Dee without the quilts.”
I looked at her hard. She had filled her bottom lip with checkerberry snuff and gave her face a kind of dopey, hangdog look. It was Grandma Dee and Big Dee who taught her how to quilt herself. She stood there with her scarred hands hidden in the folds of her skirt. She looked at her sister with something like fear but she wasn’t mad at her. This was Maggie’s portion. This was the way she knew God to work.
When I looked at her like that something hit me in the top of my head and ran down to the soles of my feet. Just like when I’m in church and the spirit of God touches me and I get happy and shout. I did some.thing I never done before: hugged Maggie to me, then dragged her on into the room, snatched the quilts out of Miss Wangero’s hands and dumped them into Maggie’s lap. Maggie just sat there on my bed with her mouth open.
“Take one or two of the others,” I said to Dee.
But she turned without a word and went out to Hakim~a~barber.
“You just don’t understand,” she said, as Maggie and I came out to the car.
“What don’t I understand?” I wanted to know.
“Your heritage,” she said, And then she turned to Maggie, kissed her, and said, “You ought to try to make something of yourself, too, Maggie. It’s really a new day for us. But from the way you and Mama still live you’d never know it.”
She put on some sunglasses that hid everything above the tip of her nose and chin.
Maggie smiled; maybe at the sunglasses. But a real smile, not scared. After we watched the car dust settle I asked Maggie to bring me a dip of snuff. And then the two of us sat there just enjoying, until it was time to go in the house and go to bed.
Discussion: Everyday Use
Discussion: Everyday Use
You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes.
Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages.
Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor.
The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.
ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CLASS
Discussion Questions (DQ)
Initial responses to the DQ should address all components of the questions asked, include a minimum of one scholarly source, and be at least 250 words.
Successful responses are substantive (i.e., add something new to the discussion, engage others in the discussion, well-developed idea) and include at least one scholarly source.
One or two sentence responses, simple statements of agreement or “good post,” and responses that are off-topic will not count as substantive. Substantive responses should be at least 150 words.
I encourage you to incorporate the readings from the week (as applicable) into your responses.
Weekly Participation
Your initial responses to the mandatory DQ do not count toward participation and are graded separately.
In addition to the DQ responses, you must post at least one reply to peers (or me) on three separate days, for a total of three replies.
Participation posts do not require a scholarly source/citation (unless you cite someone else’s work).
Part of your weekly participation includes viewing the weekly announcement and attesting to watching it in the comments. These announcements are made to ensure you understand everything that is due during the week.
APA Format and Writing Quality
Familiarize yourself with APA format and practice using it correctly. It is used for most writing assignments for your degree. Visit the Writing Center in the Student Success Center, under the Resources tab in LoudCloud for APA paper templates, citation examples, tips, etc. Points will be deducted for poor use of APA format or absence of APA format (if required).
Cite all sources of information! When in doubt, cite the source. Paraphrasing also requires a citation.
I highly recommend using the APA Publication Manual, 6th edition.
Use of Direct Quotes
I discourage overutilization of direct quotes in DQs and assignments at the Masters’ level and deduct points accordingly.
As Masters’ level students, it is important that you be able to critically analyze and interpret information from journal articles and other resources. Simply restating someone else’s words does not demonstrate an understanding of the content or critical analysis of the content.
It is best to paraphrase content and cite your source.
LopesWrite Policy
For assignments that need to be submitted to LopesWrite, please be sure you have received your report and Similarity Index (SI) percentage BEFORE you do a “final submit” to me.
Once you have received your report, please review it. This report will show you grammatical, punctuation, and spelling errors that can easily be fixed. Take the extra few minutes to review instead of getting counted off for these mistakes.
Review your similarities. Did you forget to cite something? Did you not paraphrase well enough? Is your paper made up of someone else’s thoughts more than your own?
Visit the Writing Center in the Student Success Center, under the Resources tab in LoudCloud for tips on improving your paper and SI score.
Late Policy
The university’s policy on late assignments is 10% penalty PER DAY LATE. This also applies to late DQ replies.
Please communicate with me if you anticipate having to submit an assignment late. I am happy to be flexible, with advance notice. We may be able to work out an extension based on extenuating circumstances.
If you do not communicate with me before submitting an assignment late, the GCU late policy will be in effect.
I do not accept assignments that are two or more weeks late unless we have worked out an extension.
As per policy, no assignments are accepted after the last day of class. Any assignment submitted after midnight on the last day of class will not be accepted for grading.
Communication
Communication is so very important. There are multiple ways to communicate with me:
Questions to Instructor Forum: This is a great place to ask course content or assignment questions. If you have a question, there is a good chance one of your peers does as well. This is a public forum for the class.
Individual Forum: This is a private forum to ask me questions or send me messages. This will be checked at least once every 24 hours.

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NRNP 6635 Discussion The Psychiatric Evaluation and Evidence-Based Rating Scales

NRNP 6635 Discussion The Psychiatric Evaluation and Evidence-Based Rating Scales

Assessment tools have two primary purposes: 1) to measure illness and diagnose clients, and 2) to measure a client’s response to treatment. Often, you will find that multiple assessment tools are designed to measure the same condition or response. Not all tools, however, are appropriate for use in all clinical situations. You must consider the strengths and weaknesses of each tool to select the appropriate assessment tool for your client. For this Discussion, as you examine the assessment tool assigned to you by the Course Instructor, consider its use in psychotherapy.

To Prepare:

  • Review this week’s Learning Resources and reflect on the insights they provide regarding psychiatric assessment and diagnosis.
  • Consider the elements of the psychiatric interview, history, and examination.
  • Consider the assessment tool assigned to you by the Course Instructor.

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By Day 3 of Week 2

Post a brief explanation of three important components of the psychiatric interview and why you consider these elements important. Explain the psychometric properties of the rating scale you were assigned. Explain when it is appropriate to use this rating scale with clients during the psychiatric interview and how the scale is helpful to a nurse practitioner’s psychiatric assessment. Support your approach with evidence-based literature. NRNP 6635 Discussion The Psychiatric Evaluation and Evidence-Based Rating Scales

Week 2 Discussion

Week 2 Discussion

The determination of safety should be the key element of the PMHNP’s interview to patient. In order to ensure patient safety, providers need to consider these three elements such as physical healthwell-being and ill-beingrelationships and belonging to be important components of the psychiatric interview.

First and foremost, screening physical health is crucial because it is the first clinical step in effective diagnosis and treatment of a patient. Poor physical health can lead to an increased risk of developing mental health problems. Similarly, poor mental health can negatively impact on physical health, leading to an increased risk of some conditions. Furthermore, some physical diseases are linked to psychotropic treatment. Consequently, people with serious mental illness experience heightened rate of preventable and treatable physical illnesses, comorbidities such as obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Thus, questions to ask may include for instance: What health concerns do you have?  How are your sleeping habits over the past 4 weeks?  Have you noticed any changes, difficulty sleeping? How would describe your current appetite? Have your eating habits altered in any way?

Next, asking patients about their Well- being or ill-being would allow the PMHNP to assess their quality of life, feelings of anxiety, distress, motivation, and energy. Sample questions could be: Have you had little pleasure or interest in the activities you usually enjoy over the past few months? Have you been concerned by low feelings, stress, sadness, and nervousness?  Besides, as safety remained a priority for the provider, questions about suicide, self-harm, homicide, domestic violence and abuse will not be omitted from the interview. NRNP 6635 Discussion The Psychiatric Evaluation and Evidence-Based Rating Scales

Moreover, it is import ant to ask during a psychiatric interview about a client ‘s relationships and belonging to know how client ‘s feelings and believes about his/her society and environments, to know if he/she feels accepted, supported, and possessed meaningful relationships. Possible questions that can be asked are: Do you have friends, family, or otherwise? How do you feel by others around you? Tell me about how you have been feeling about your relationships recently.

Explain the psychometric properties of the rating scale you were assigned.

My assigned rating scale is the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) or Quick inventory of Depressive Symptoms (QIDS-SR16), which is the only brief self-report instrument that assesses all of the clinical domains used in making a diagnosis of MDD based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. The QIDS-SR16 rates symptom domains during the prior 7 days. Each item is scored on a scale from 0 to 3 points. Total scores range from 0 to 27.

The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms (QIDS-SR16) is a short and easy-to-use self-report instrument to assess depressive symptoms (Lako et al., 2014).

It is a new measure of depressive symptom severity derived from the 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS), which is available in both self-report (QIDS-SR(16)) and clinician-rated (QIDS-C(16)) formats. This report evaluates and compares the psychometric properties of the QIDS-SR(16) in relation to the IDS-SR(30) and the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Rush et al., 2003)

The measure consists of 16 items, covering nine depressive symptom domains. These are sleep, sad mood, appetite/weight, energy, self-view, interest, psychomotor, suicidal thoughts, concentration (Rush et al., 2005)

Explain when it is appropriate to use this rating scale with clients during the psychiatric interview and how the scale is helpful to a nurse practitioner’s psychiatric assessment.

The QIDS-SR16 is sensitive to symptomatic change and its psychometric properties are good in patients with depressive disorders.

Although the Quick inventory of Depressive Symptoms (QIDS-SR16) may provide unique and clinically relevant information on depressive symptoms, this self-report instrument is not suitable for the use in patients with psychotic disorders (Lako et al., 2014)

The 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS), a new measure of depressive symptom severity derived from the 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS), is available in both self-report (QIDS-SR(16)) and clinician-rated (QIDS-C(16)) formats. This report evaluates and compares the psychometric properties of the QIDS-SR(16) in relation to the IDS-SR(30) and the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression

the QIDS-SR16 is the only brief self-report instrument that assesses all of the clinical domains used in making a diagnosis of MDD based on DSM-IV-TR criteria.

The QIDS-SR16 rates symptom domains during the prior 7 days. Each item is scored on a scale from 0 to 3 points. Total scores range from 0 to 27 (Rush et al., 2005).

References;

Lako, I.M., Wigman, J.T., Klaassen, R.M., Slooff,J.C., Taxis, K., Velthuis,  A.B. (2014). Psychometric properties of the self-report version of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms (QIDS-SR16) questionnaire in patients with schizophrenia. BMC Psychiatry 14, 247 (2014). Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-014-0247-2

Rush, J., Trivedi, M.H., Ibrahim, M.H., Carmody, T.J., Arnow, B., Klein, D. N., Markowitz, J. C., Ninan, P.T., Kornstein, S., Manber, R., Thase, M.E., Kocsis, J.H., Keller, M.B. (2003). The 16-Item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS), clinician rating (QIDS-C), and self-report (QIDS-SR): a psychometric evaluation in patients with chronic major depression. Retrieved from

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12946886/

Rush, J., Bernstein, H.J., Trivedi, M.H., Carmody, T.J., Wisniewski, S., Mundt, J.C., Shores-Wilson, K., Biggs, M.M., Woo, A., Nierenberg, A.A., and Fava, M. (2005). An Evaluation of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression: A Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression Trial Report. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2005.08.022. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2929841/

Read a selection of your colleagues’ responses.

By Day 6 of Week 2

Respond to at least two of your colleagues on 2 different days by comparing your assessment tool to theirs.

Note: For this Discussion, you are required to complete your initial post before you will be able to view and respond to your colleagues’ postings. Begin by clicking on the “Post to Discussion Question” link, and then select “Create Thread” to complete your initial post. Remember, once you click on Submit, you cannot delete or edit your own posts, and you cannot post anonymously. Please check your post carefully before clicking on Submit!

Submission and Grading Information

RE: Week 2 Discussion

Hello Sika,

I think our scales are both tools that would likely be used in conjunction with each other. It seems that the QIDS-SR16 is used to monitor symptoms related to depression on a broader scale and can be completed quickly. The Quality of Life in Depression Scale (QLDS) in contrast is more specified to specifically the patient’s quality of life. Scenarios in which the QLDS would be used rather the QIDS would be when a broad understanding of the patient’s general depressive symptoms is had, but it is unclear if the patient is having an acceptable quality of day-to-day experience. The QLDS is described as developed in order to help resolve scenarios in which the counselor and patient have disagreement about the result of treatment (McKenna & Hunt, 1992). A scenario in which the provider may interpret the patient as having decrease in symptoms while the patient feels they have worsened may be a time when this tool in useful. In contrast the QIDS-SR16 seems to be a tool that would be repeated each visit in order to monitor for the progression of the patient’s depression symptoms. A situation in which the QIDS would be used would likely be involve a patient who is getting regular treatment for depression and is having monitoring to track the effectiveness of the medication (Rush, A., et al., 2003).

References

McKenna, S., & Hunt, S. (1992, October). The qlds: A scale for the measurement of quality of life in depression. Retrieved March 13, 2021, from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10122730/

Rush, A. J., Trivedi, M. H., Ibrahim, H. M., Carmody, T. J., Arnow, B., Klein, D. N., Markowitz, J. C.,

Ninan, P. T., Kornstein, S., Manber, R., Thase, M. E., Kocsis, J. H., & Keller, M. B. (2003). The 16-Item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS), clinician rating (QIDS-C), and self-report (QIDS-SR): a psychometric evaluation in patients with chronic major depression. Biological psychiatry, 54(5), 573–583. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0006-3223(02)01866-8

RE: Week 2 Discussion

Sika, you posted some important elements of the psychiatric interview such as finding out how the patient is doing by asking “How do you feel by others around you? Tell me about how you have been feeling about your relationships recently.” I would like to dig in here a bit. At this point the patient may disclose to you his or her relationship strains due to finances, chronic illnesses, or even homelessness. I believe that no matter the skill and personality of the provider if the provider is not sensitive to the immediate and pressing needs of the patient, the interview will go nowhere. Consider a patient becoming depressed because they have chronic pain. I think the patient would feel better if the pain was managed rather than completing the interview at that time. Additionally, symptoms of depression include hopelessness, worthlessness, helplessness, and loss of interest or pleasure in activities may manifest due to loss of employment. Mucedola (2015) Maslow  discussed that people are motivated to achieve certain needs and outlined “five stages (in ascending order: physiological, safety, social, esteem, and self-actualization) that individuals work to fulfill as they strive toward reaching their full potential” I strongly believe the practice of PMHNPs who care for patient with a nursing model, has full understanding of caring for the needs of the patients that they will interview and will carry the holistic way of practice to the psychiatric interview clinic.

References

Fincher, M., Coomer, T., Hicks, J., Johnson, J., Lineros, J., Olivarez, C. P., & Randolph, A. J. (2018). Responses to hunger on the community college campus. New Directions for Community Colleges, 2018(184), 51-59. doi:http://dx.doi.org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1002/cc.20327

Gomes, O. (2011). The hierarchy of human needs and their social valuation. International Journal of Social Economics, 38(3), 237-259. doi:http://dx.doi.org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1108/03068291111105183

Mucedola, M. S. (2015). Depression, suicide, and maslow’s hierarchy of needs: A preventive approach. Journal of Health Education Teaching Techniques, 2(3) Retrieved from https://ezp.waldenulibrary.org/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fscholarly-journals%2Fdepression-suicide-maslows-hierarchy-needs%2

Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:

Week 2 Discussion Rubric

Post by Day 3 of Week 2 and Respond by Day 6 of Week 2

To Participate in this Discussion:

Week 2 Discussion


What’s Coming Up in Module 2?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images

In Module 2, you will begin a systematic review of mental health disorders. You will apply concepts, theories, and principles related to patient interviewing, diagnostic reasoning, and recording patient information. You will also formulate differential diagnoses for patients across the lifespan using DSM-5 criteria.

Next Module

Week 2: Assessment and Diagnosis of the Psychiatric Patient

A sensitively crafted intake assessment can be a powerful therapeutic tool. It can establish rapport between patient and therapist, further the therapeutic alliance, alleviate anxiety, provide reassurance, and facilitate the flow of information necessary for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan.

—Pamela Bjorklund, clinical psychologist

 

Whether you are treating patients for physical ailments or clients for mental health issues, the assessment process is an inextricable part of health care. To properly diagnose clients and develop treatment plans, you must have a strong foundation in assessment. This includes a working knowledge of assessments that are available to aid in diagnosis, how to use these assessments, and how to select the most appropriate assessment based on a client’s presentation.

This week, as you explore assessment and diagnosis of patients in mental health settings, you examine assessment tools, including their psychometric properties and appropriate uses. You also familiarize yourself with the DSM-5 classification system.

Reference: Bjorklund, P. (2013). Assessment and diagnosis. In K. Wheeler (Ed.), Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice (2nd ed.) (pp. 95–168). Springer Publishing Company.

Learning Objectives

Students will:

  •  Evaluate elements of the psychiatric interview, history, and examination
  •  Analyze psychometric properties of psychiatric rating scales
  • Justify appropriate use of psychiatric rating scales in advanced practice nursing

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

Carlat, D. J. (2017). The psychiatric interview (4th ed.). Wolters Kluwer.

  • Chapter 34, Writing Up the Results of the Interview

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.). Wolters Kluwer.

  • Chapter 5, Examination and Diagnosis of the Psychiatric Patient
  • Chapter 6, Classification in Psychiatry
  • Chapter 31, Child Psychiatry (Sections 31.1 and 31.2 only)
Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

MedEasy. (2017). Psychiatric history taking and the mental status examination | USMLE & COMLEX [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5KwDgWX8L8

Psychiatry Lectures. (2015). Psychiatry lecture: How to do a psychiatric assessment [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRiCntvec5U

Getting Started With the DSM-5

If you were to give a box of 100 different photographs to 10 people and ask them to sort them into groups, it is very unlikely that all 10 people would sort them into the exact same groups. However, if you were to give them a series of questions or a classification system to use, the chances that all 10 people sort them exactly the same increases depending on the specificity of the system and the knowledge of those sorting the photographs.Photo Credit: [Peter Polak]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images

This is not unlike what has occurred in the process of classifying mental disorders. A system that provides enough specificity to appropriately classify a large variety of mental disorders while also attempting to include all of the possible symptoms, many of which can change over time, is a daunting task when used by a variety of specialists, doctors, and other professionals with varied experience, cultures, expertise, and beliefs. The DSM has undergone many transformations since it was first published in 1952. Many of these changes occurred because the uses for the DSM changed. However, the greatest changes began with the use of extensive empirical research to guide the creation of the classification system and its continued revisions.

In order to assess and diagnose patients, you must learn to use the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, usually abbreviated as the DSM-5, to render a diagnosis. In this second week of the course, you will examine how DSM-5 is organized and how clinicians use it to render diagnoses.

Review the Learning Resources this week, with special emphasis on viewing the Diagnostic Criteria video. This video explains the purpose and organization of the DSM-5 classification system, the purpose of the ICD-10 coding system, their relationship to one another, and the importance to the PMHNP role.

Rubric Detail

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Name: NRNP_6635_Week2_Discussion_Rubric
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Excellent Good Fair Poor
Main Posting:

Response to the discussion question is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis representative of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.
40 (40%) – 44 (44%)
Thoroughly responds to the discussion question(s).

Is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis representative of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

No less than 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least 3 current credible sources.
35 (35%) – 39 (39%)
Responds to most of the discussion question(s).

Is somewhat reflective with critical analysis and synthesis representative of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

50% of the post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least 3 credible references.
31 (31%) – 34 (34%)
Responds to some of the discussion question(s).

One to two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed.

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Post is cited with fewer than 2 credible references.
0 (0%) – 30 (30%)
Does not respond to the discussion question(s).

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria.

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Contains only 1 or no credible references.
Main Posting:

 

Writing
6 (6%) – 6 (6%)
Written clearly and concisely.

Contains no grammatical or spelling errors.

Further adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Written concisely.

May contain one to two grammatical or spelling errors.

Adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Written somewhat concisely.

May contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Contains some APA formatting errors.
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Not written clearly or concisely.

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.
Main Posting:

 

Timely and full participation
9 (9%) – 10 (10%)
Meets requirements for timely, full, and active participation.

Posts main discussion by due date.
8 (8%) – 8 (8%)
Posts main discussion by due date.

Meets requirements for full participation.
7 (7%) – 7 (7%)
Posts main discussion by due date.
0 (0%) – 6 (6%)
Does not meet requirements for full participation.

Does not post main discussion by due date.
First Response:

 

Post to colleague’s main post that is reflective and justified with credible sources.
9 (9%) – 9 (9%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Responds to questions posed by faculty.

The use of scholarly sources to support ideas demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.
8 (8%) – 8 (8%)
Response has some depth and may exhibit critical thinking or application to practice setting.
7 (7%) – 7 (7%)
Response is on topic, may have some depth.
0 (0%) – 6 (6%)
Response may not be on topic, lacks depth.
First Response:

Writing
6 (6%) – 6 (6%)
Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Response to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in Standard, Edited English.
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Communication is mostly professional and respectful to colleagues.

Response to faculty questions are mostly answered, if posed.

Provides opinions and ideas that are supported by few credible sources.

Response is written in Standard, Edited English.
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Response posed in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Response to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Few or no credible sources are cited.
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Responses posted in the discussion lack effective communication.

Response to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
First Response:

Timely and full participation
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for timely, full, and active participation.

Posts by due date.
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Meets requirements for full participation.

Posts by due date.
3 (3%) – 3 (3%)
Posts by due date.
0 (0%) – 2 (2%)
Does not meet requirements for full participation.

Does not post by due date.
Second Response:

Post to colleague’s main post that is reflective and justified with credible sources.
9 (9%) – 9 (9%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Responds to questions posed by faculty.

The use of scholarly sources to support ideas demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.
8 (8%) – 8 (8%)
Response has some depth and may exhibit critical thinking or application to practice setting.
7 (7%) – 7 (7%)
Response is on topic, may have some depth.
0 (0%) – 6 (6%)
Response may not be on topic, lacks depth.
Second Response:

Writing
6 (6%) – 6 (6%)
Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Response to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in Standard, Edited English.
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Communication is mostly professional and respectful to colleagues.

Response to faculty questions are mostly answered, if posed.

Provides opinions and ideas that are supported by few credible sources.

Response is written in Standard, Edited English.
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Response posed in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Response to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Few or no credible sources are cited.
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Responses posted in the discussion lack effective communication.

Response to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Second Response:

Timely and full participation
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for timely, full, and active participation.

Posts by due date.
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Meets requirements for full participation.

Posts by due date.
3 (3%) – 3 (3%)
Posts by due date.
0 (0%) – 2 (2%)
Does not meet requirements for full participation.

Does not post by due date.
Total Points: 100
Name: NRNP_6635_Week2_Discussion_Rubric

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Assignment: Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders

Assignment: Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders

Many individuals seeking treatment meet the criteria for both mental health and substance-related disorders. Regardless of whether you specialize in substance-related disorders, all advanced practice nurses should know their signs and symptoms and how to assess and diagnose them. There are assessment and screening tools available to clinicians, and a plethora of information can be obtained through the diagnostic interview. It takes time and experience to know what types of questions to ask to gain the most information, in addition to a basic knowledge of the substances and behaviors you are trying to assess. It can be complicated to sort out substance use disorders from other mental health disorders, but most clients seeking treatment have comorbidities.

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This week, you apply DSM-5 substance use and addictive criteria as you formulate a diagnosis for a patient in a case study.

Learning Objectives

Students will:

  • Apply concepts, theories, and principles related to patient interviewing, diagnostic reasoning, and recording patient information
  • Formulate differential diagnoses using DSM-5 criteria for patients with substance-related and addictive disorders across the lifespan

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.). Wolters Kluwer.

  • Chapter 20, Substance Use and Addictive Disorders
  • Chapter 31.16, Adolescent Substance Abuse

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Exemplar

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Complex Care Consulting. (2018, April 4). Addiction neuroscience 101 [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwZcPwlRRcc

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Video Case Selections for Assignment (click to expand/reduce)

Select one of the following videos to use for your Assignment this week. Then, access the document “Case History Reports” and review the additional data about the patient in the specific video number you selected.

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2017). Training title 82 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-82

Search transcript

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2018). Training title 114-2 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-114-2

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2018). Training title 151 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-151

Assignment: Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders

An important consideration when working with patients is their cultural background. Understanding an individual’s culture and personal experiences provides insight into who the person is and where he or she may progress in the future. Culture helps to establish a sense of identity, as well as to set values, behaviors, and purpose for individuals within a society. Culture may also contribute to a divide between specific interpretations of cultural behavior and societal norms. What one culture may deem as appropriate another culture may find inappropriate. As a result, it is important for advanced practice nurses to remain aware of cultural considerations and interpretations of behavior for diagnosis, especially with reference to substance-related disorders. At the same time, PMHNPs must balance their professional and legal responsibilities for assessment and diagnosis with such cultural considerations and interpretations.

For this Assignment, you will practice assessing and diagnosing a patient in a case study who is experiencing a substance-related or addictive disorder. With this and all cases, remember to consider the patient’s cultural background.

To Prepare:

  • Review this week’s Learning Resources and consider the insights they provide.
  • Review the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation template, which you will use to complete this Assignment.
  • By Day 1 of this week, select a specific video case study to use for this Assignment from the Video Case Selections choices in the Learning Resources. View your assigned video case and review the additional data for the case in the “Case History Reports” document, keeping the requirements of the evaluation template in mind.
  • Consider what history would be necessary to collect from this patient.
  • Consider what interview questions you would need to ask this patient.
  • Identify at least three possible differential diagnoses for the patient.
By Day 7 of Week 8

Complete and submit your Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation, including your differential diagnosis and critical-thinking process to formulate primary diagnosis.

Incorporate the following into your responses in the template:

  • Subjective: What details did the patient provide regarding their chief complaint and symptomology to derive your differential diagnosis? What is the duration and severity of their symptoms? How are their symptoms impacting their functioning in life?
  • Objective: What observations did you make during the psychiatric assessment?
  • Assessment: Discuss the patient’s mental status examination results. What were your differential diagnoses? Provide a minimum of three possible diagnoses with supporting evidence, listed in order from highest priority to lowest priority. Compare the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for each differential diagnosis and explain what DSM-5 criteria rules out the differential diagnosis to find an accurate diagnosis. Explain the critical-thinking process that led you to the primary diagnosis you selected. Include pertinent positives and pertinent negatives for the specific patient case.
  • Reflection notes: What would you do differently with this client if you could conduct the session over? Also include in your reflection a discussion related to legal/ethical considerations (demonstrate critical thinking beyond confidentiality and consent for treatment!), health promotion and disease prevention taking into consideration patient factors (such as age, ethnic group, etc.), PMH, and other risk factors (e.g., socioeconomic, cultural background, etc.).

Submission and Grading Information

To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:

  • Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK8Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.
  • Click the Week 8 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
  • Click the Week 8 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from this area.
  • Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “WK8Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
  • If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
  • Click on the Submit button to complete your submission. Assignment: Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:

Week 8 Assignment Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:

Submit your Week 8 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 8

To participate in this Assignment:

Week 8 Assignment

What’s Coming Up in Week 9?Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images

In Week 9, you will continue to practice your assessment and diagnostic reasoning skills, focusing next week on personality and paraphilic disorders.

Next Week

Rubric Detail

Select Grid View or List View to change the rubric’s layout.

Name: NRNP_6635_Week8_Assignment_Rubric
Grid View
List View
Excellent Good Fair Poor
Create documentation in the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template about the patient you selected.

In the Subjective section, provide:
• Chief complaint
• History of present illness (HPI)
• Past psychiatric history
• Medication trials and current medications
• Psychotherapy or previous psychiatric diagnosis
• Pertinent substance use, family psychiatric/substance use, social, and medical history
• Allergies
• ROS
18 (18%) – 20 (20%)
The response throughly and accurately describes the patient’s subjective complaint, history of present illness, past psychiatric history, medication trials and current medications, psychotherapy or previous psychiatric diagnosis, pertinent histories, allergies, and review of all systems that would inform a differential diagnosis.
16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
The response accurately describes the patient’s subjective complaint, history of present illness, past psychiatric history, medication trials and current medications, psychotherapy or previous psychiatric diagnosis, pertinent histories, allergies, and review of all systems that would inform a differential diagnosis.
14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
The response describes the patient’s subjective complaint, history of present illness, past psychiatric history, medication trials and current medications, psychotherapy or previous psychiatric diagnosis, pertinent histories, allergies, and review of all systems that would inform a differential diagnosis, but is somewhat vague or contains minor innacuracies.
0 (0%) – 13 (13%)
The response provides an incomplete or inaccurate description of the patient’s subjective complaint, history of present illness, past psychiatric history, medication trials and current medications, psychotherapy or previous psychiatric diagnosis, pertinent histories, allergies, and review of all systems that would inform a differential diagnosis. Or, subjective documentation is missing.
In the Objective section, provide:
• Physical exam documentation of systems pertinent to the chief complaint, HPI, and history
• Diagnostic results, including any labs, imaging, or other assessments needed to develop the differential diagnoses.
18 (18%) – 20 (20%)
The response thoroughly and accurately documents the patient’s physical exam for pertinent systems. Diagnostic tests and their results are thoroughly and accurately documented.
16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
The response accurately documents the patient’s physical exam for pertinent systems. Diagnostic tests and their results are accurately documented.
14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
Documentation of the patient’s physical exam is somewhat vague or contains minor innacuracies. Diagnostic tests and their results are documented but contain minor innacuracies.
0 (0%) – 13 (13%)
The response provides incomplete or inaccurate documentation of the patient’s physical exam. Systems may have been unnecessarily reviewed, or, objective documentation is missing.
In the Assessment section, provide:
• Results of the mental status examination, presented in paragraph form.
• At least three differentials with supporting evidence. List them from top priority to least priority. Compare the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for each differential diagnosis and explain what DSM-5 criteria rules out the differential diagnosis to find an accurate diagnosis. Explain the critical-thinking process that led you to the primary diagnosis you selected. Include pertinent positives and pertinent negatives for the specific patient case.
23 (23%) – 25 (25%)
The response thoroughly and accurately documents the results of the mental status exam.

Response lists at least three distinctly different and detailed possible disorders in order of priority for a differential diagnosis of the patient in the assigned case study, and it provides a thorough, accurate, and detailed justification for each of the disorders selected.
20 (20%) – 22 (22%)
The response accurately documents the results of the mental status exam.

Response lists at least three distinctly different and detailed possible disorders in order of priority for a differential diagnosis of the patient in the assigned case study, and it provides an accurate justification for each of the disorders selected.
18 (18%) – 19 (19%)
The response documents the results of the mental status exam with some vagueness or innacuracy.

Response lists at least three different possible disorders for a differential diagnosis of the patient and provides a justification for each, but may contain some vaguess or innacuracy.
0 (0%) – 17 (17%)
The response provides an incomplete or inaccurate description of the results of the mental status exam and explanation of the differential diagnoses. Or, assessment documentation is missing.
Reflect on this case. Discuss what you learned and what you might do differently. Also include in your reflection a discussion related to legal/ethical considerations (demonstrate critical thinking beyond confidentiality and consent for treatment!), health promotion and disease prevention taking into consideration patient factors (such as age, ethnic group, etc.), PMH, and other risk factors (e.g., socioeconomic, cultural background, etc.).
9 (9%) – 10 (10%)
Reflections are thorough, thoughtful, and demonstrate critical thinking.
8 (8%) – 8 (8%)
Reflections demonstrate critical thinking.
7 (7%) – 7 (7%)
Reflections are somewhat general or do not demonstrate critical thinking.
0 (0%) – 6 (6%)
Reflections are incomplete, inaccurate, or missing.
Provide at least three evidence-based, peer-reviewed journal articles or evidenced-based guidelines that relate to this case to support your diagnostics and differential diagnoses. Be sure they are current (no more than 5 years old).
14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
The response provides at least three current, evidence-based resources from the literature to support the assessment and diagnosis of the patient in the assigned case study. The resources reflect the latest clinical guidelines and provide strong justification for decision making.
12 (12%) – 13 (13%)
The response provides at least three current, evidence-based resources from the literature that appropriately support the assessment and diagnosis of the patient in the assigned case study.
11 (11%) – 11 (11%)
Three evidence-based resources are provided to support assessment and diagnosis of the patient in the assigned case study, but they may only provide vague or weak justification.
0 (0%) – 10 (10%)
Two or fewer resources are provided to support assessment and diagnosis decisions. The resources may not be current or evidence based.
Written Expression and Formatting—Paragraph development and organization:
Paragraphs make clear points that support well-developed ideas, flow logically, and demonstrate continuity of ideas. Sentences are carefully focused—neither long and rambling nor short and lacking substance. A clear and comprehensive purpose statement and introduction are provided that delineate all required criteria.
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity.

A clear and comprehensive purpose statement, introduction, and conclusion are provided that delineate all required criteria.
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 80% of the time.

Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment are stated, yet they are brief and not descriptive.
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 60%–79% of the time.

Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment is vague or off topic.
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity less than 60% of the time.

No purpose statement, introduction, or conclusion were provided.
Written Expression and Formatting—English writing standards:
Correct grammar, mechanics, and punctuation
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Uses correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation with no errors
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Contains a few (one or two) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors
3 (3%) – 3 (3%)
Contains several (three or four) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors
0 (0%) – 2 (2%)
Contains many (≥ five) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors that interfere with the reader’s understanding
Total Points: 100
Name: NRNP_6635_Week8_Assignment_Rubric

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NUR 319 Nursing Assignment

NUR 319 Nursing Assignment

Please answer the following questions. (15%) 1.What is meant by evidence based practice? 2.Why is it important that we use evidence based practice? Please ensure that your work is supported using appropriate and academic sources. Please read the research article below and answer the questions. You should start each section on a separate page. Please ensure that your work demonstrates critical analysis and is supported using appropriate academic sources.
Hermanson, A. & Åstrandb, L., L. (2020) The effects of early pacifier use on breastfeeding: A randomised controlled trial. Women and Birth, 33, 473-482. Study Design  3.Did the research address a clearly focused research question? 4.Were the participants clearly identified? Why is this important? 5. Was the intervention clearly described? Why is this important? 6. Was the assignment of participants to interventions randomised? 7.How was randomisation carried out and was it sufficient to eliminate systematic bias? 8. Was the aim of the research clearly identified and why is this important? 9.Discuss the reasons why observational studies have found associations between pacifier use and shorter breastfeeding duration, while results from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) did not reveal any difference in breastfeeding outcomes. 10. Were all participants who entered the study accounted for at its conclusion? Methodological Considerations11.Were the participants ‘blind’ to intervention they were given? Consider the benefits of using a ‘blind’ design. 12.Were the baseline characteristics of each study group (intervention group and control group) clearly identified? 13.Prior to collecting data why is important that the questionnaires used, were validated? 14. Apart from the experimental intervention, did each study group receive the same level of care (that is, were they treated equally)? Why is this important?

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Asthma Exacerbation Gabriel Martinez shadow health Objective Data

Asthma Exacerbation Gabriel Martinez shadow health Objective Data

Objective Data Collection: 9.6 of 11 (87.27%)

  •  Correct
  •  Partially correct
  •  Incorrect
  •  Missed
 Assessed Vitals – Pre-Intervention
0.8 of 1 point
Temperature (1/5 point)
  •  Normothermic
  •  Hyperthermic
  •  Hypothermic
Blood Pressure (1/5 point)
  •  Normotensive
  •  Hypertensive
  •  Hypotensive
Heart Rate (1/5 point)

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  •  No abnormal findings
  •  Tachycardia
  •  Bradycardia
Respiratory Rate (1/5 point)
  •  No abnormal findings
  •  Tachypnea
  •  Bradypnea
Oxygen Saturation (No point)
  •  No abnormal findings
  •  Hypoxemia
 Auscultated Breath Sounds – Pre-Intervention
1 of 1 point
Breath Sounds (1/1 point)
  •  Normal Breathing
  •  Expiratory wheezing
  •  Inspiratory wheezing
  •  Diminished breath sounds
 Inspected Chest – Pre-Intervention
1 of 1 point
Sites Of Retraction (1/1 point)
  •  No visible abnormal findings
  •  Superclavicular
  •  Supersternal
  •  Substernal
  •  Subcostal
  •  Intercostal
 Assess Dyspnea – Pre-Intervention
1 of 1 point
Speech Characteristics (1/1 point)
  •  Speaks full sentences
  •  Speaks partial sentences
  •  Speaks short phrases OR single words
 Assessed PAS – Pre-Intervention
0 of 1 point
 Assessed Vitals
0.8 of 1 point
 Auscultated Breath Sounds
1 of 1 point
 Inspected Chest
1 of 1 point
Symmetry (1/3 point)
  •  Symmetric
  •  Asymmetric
Appearance (1/3 point)
  •  No visible abnormal findings
  •  Rash
  •  Barrel chest
  •  Excessive use of accessory muscles while breathing
  •  Skin growths (freckles or moles)
  • Asthma Exacerbation Gabriel Martinez shadow health Objective Data
Sites Of Retractions (1/3 point)
  •  No visible abnormal findings
  •  Superclavicular
  •  Supersternal
  •  Substernal
  •  Subcostal
  •  Intercostal
 Assess Dyspnea
1 of 1 point
 Assessed PAS
1 of 1 point
 Assessed Growth
1 of 1 point Asthma Exacerbation Gabriel Martinez shadow health Objective Data
Gabriel Martinez Asthma Exacerbation Shadow
health Transcript
Begin by confirming the patient’s
name and date of birth. Which of
the following is the most
appropriate way to do so?
Hello. I’ll be taking care of you
tonight. Can you tell me your
name and when you were born?
Question
01/23/21
6:33 PM
PST
Hey . . . Gabriel . . . I’m 8 . . .”
His name is Gabriel Martinez.
Gabriel is 8.
You should also confirm Ms.
Martinez’s relationship with
Gabriel. Which of the following
questions is the most
appropriate way to do so?
Hello. Are you Gabriel’s
guardian?
Question
01/23/21
6:34 PM
PST
Yes. I’m his mother.
GABRIEL MARTINEZ ASTHMA EXACERBATION SHADOW HEALTH
TRANSCRIPT
Begin by confirming the
patient’s name and date of
birth. Which of the following is
the most appropriate way to
do so?
Hello. I’ll be taking care of you
tonight. What’s your name
and when were you born,
kindly?
Hey . . . Gabriel . . . I’m 8 . . .”
Question
01/23/2
1
6:33 PM
PST
His name is Gabriel Martinez. Gabriel is 8.
You should also confirm Ms.
Martinez’s relationship with
Gabriel. Which of the
following questions is the
most appropriate way to do
so?
Hello. Are you
Gabriel’s guardian?
Yes. I’m his mother.
Question
01/23/2
1
6:34 PM
PSTWhich of the following
actions should you perform
first?
I want to interview the
patient and guardian to
establish Chief Complaint.
What brings you in today?
It’s really hard to breathe . .
. I have asthma . . .
Yes, my son started having
difficulty breathing after
school today. It’s been about
4 hours or so.
What should you do next?
Question
01/23/2
1
6:37 PM
PST
Question
01/23/2
1
6:38 PM
PSTNow that I have established
Gabriel’s chief complaint, I
need to take his vitals and
conduct a pediatric asthma
severity (PAS) score to better
understand the severity of the
patient’s condition.
Perform all of the following
assesments and record the
vitals in your EHR. Use the PAS
Score tab in the EHR to
calculate Gabriel’s total score
and choose the appropriate
exacerbation severity for
Assessed PAS – PreIntervention
in the Objective Data tab.
Auscultated breath
sounds: expiratory and
inspiratory wheezing
Select your next course
of action.
Question
01/23/2
1
6:39 PM
PST
Exam
Action
01/23/2
1
6:40 PM
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NUR 350 Module Five Health Education Activity

NUR 350 Module Five Health Education Activity

Health Education Activity

TOPIC –    Pressure Ulcers and the Vulnerable Elderly Population @ Mary Manning Walsh

You Must fill out the Module Five Health Education Activity ATTACHMENT using the following instructions below. Also using Milestone 1 and Milestone 2 attached below as reference.

Instructions for NUR 350 Module Five Health Education Activity

This week, you should be wrapping up the evaluation and reflection stages of your health education activity. Submit your completed Planner and Log worksheet.

Review the Guideline and Rubric for this activity as long as the Planner and Log and Permission Letter.  Remember: All planning work counts toward your eight hours!

NUR 350 Module Five Health Education Activity Guidelines and Rubric Overview: To supplement your final project and your shared experiences with peers in this course, you are asked to perform eight hours of clinical practice experience in the field. For this activity, you will first review available data and demographics for your local area, then choose a vulnerable population to assess, and diagnose their need, then plan, implement, and evaluate a health education activity as a response to the need. Examples of a qualifying health education activity include a presentation on how to include physical activity into daily life at a senior center, an interactive activity for school-age children teaching them about eating healthy, or a presentation to healthcare providers on incorporating cultural competence into their practice. Guidance will be provided in each module to keep you on track with this activity, which follows the nursing process. Though nothing is due until Module Five, you are strongly encouraged to follow the recommended timeline to avoid last-minute rushing to get things done. Additionally, note that you must obtain permission (using the Clinical Practice Experience Permission Letter) from the site where you plan to complete your activity prior to implementing it. Finally, students must also submit the following completed evaluation form: NUR 350 Evaluation of Facility which they will complete.

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Students will not be providing direct patient care. Prompt: To complete this activity, ensure that you fill out the provided worksheet (Health Education Activity Planner and Log) completely for each critical element. Each section should be one to two paragraphs in length:

Assessment: In the Module One discussion, you will review available data and choose a local vulnerable population as the focus of the rest of this activity. For this section, write a summary of your assessment of the community where the activity is being presented.

Diagnosis: Identify the health needs of the chosen vulnerable population. Include a NANDA community nursing diagnosis and support with evidence. Plan: Outline your plan for implementing a health education activity that will meet the needs of your chosen vulnerable population. This should include

the articulation of two SMART goals, and plans to evaluate the achievement of these goals. Implementation: Explain the implementation process for your health education activity. You do not need to include the planning steps again, but discuss

what you did and how you did it. Evaluation: Evaluate the success of your health education activity based on feedback from the audience. Do you think that you achieved your SMART

goals? Why or why not? Support your evaluation with evidence. Reflection: Look back on all the steps you have completed so far (assessment through evaluation) and reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of your

approach. Knowing what you know now, how could you improve future health education opportunities? Log of Hours: Ensure that you have completed eight hours of clinical practice experience. You are encouraged to fill this log out as you go, and it should

be an accurate depiction of how you spent your time preparing for, implementing, and evaluating your health education activity.

Rubric Guidelines for Submission: You must complete all fields in the provided Planner and Log worksheet. Each section should be one to two paragraphs in length, double-spaced.

 

 

 

Critical Elements Proficient (100%) Needs Improvement (70%) Not Evident (0%) Value

Assessment Assesses a local vulnerable population for its health needs

Assesses a local vulnerable population for its health needs, but description is unclear or has gaps

Does not assess a local vulnerable population for its health needs

10

Diagnosis Develops a community nursing diagnosis for the health needs of a local vulnerable population and supports choice with evidence

Develops a community nursing diagnosis for the health needs of a local vulnerable population, but description contains insufficient detail or lacks evidence

Does not develop a community nursing diagnosis for the health needs of a local vulnerable population

15

Plan Articulates the steps involved in the planning process for the health education activity and includes two SMART goals

Briefly articulates the steps involved in the planning process for the health education activity, or a SMART goal is missing

Does not articulate the steps involved in the planning process or the SMART goals associated with the health education activity

20

Implementation Explains the implementation process for the health education activity

Explanation of the implementation process is brief or lacks sufficient detail

Does not explain the implementation process

20

Evaluation Evaluates the health education activity for how it achieved the articulated SMART goals

Briefly evaluates the health education activity with respect to articulated SMART goals, or fails to address one or both of the SMART goals

Does not evaluate the health education activity for how it achieved the articulated SMART goals

15

Reflection Reflects on the process of developing and implementing the health education activity, and provides sufficient detail on future improvements

Briefly reflects on the process of developing and implementing the health education activity, with gaps in explanation of future improvements

Does not reflect on the process of developing and implementing the health education activity

15

Log of Hours Logs hours Does not log hours 5

Total 100%

Module Five Health Education Activity Planner and Log

In each section below, write one to two paragraphs, double-spaced. For full instructions, review the Module Five Health Education Activity Guidelines and Rubric document.

Process Step Explanation/Student Response
Assessment Write a summary of your assessment of the community where the activity is being presented (one to two paragraphs).

 

Diagnosis Include a NANDA community nursing diagnosis (for example, “Insert diagnosis related to as evidenced by . . .”). Then, support your diagnosis and be sure to include evidence (one to two paragraphs).

 

Plan Share two SMART goals here. Then, discuss your plan to achieve these two goals and how you will evaluate their achievement (one to two paragraphs).

 

Implement Discuss the process of implementing your health education activity. You do not need to include the planning steps again, but discuss what you did and how you did it (one to two paragraphs).

 

Evaluate Now that you have completed the educational activity, evaluate the achievement of your two SMART goals. Be specific and provide examples (one to two paragraphs).

 

Reflection Look back on all the steps you have completed so far (assessment through evaluation) and reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of your approach. Knowing what you know now, how could you improve future health education opportunities? (One to two paragraphs)

 

 

Instructions: Fill out the time log below for each activity you complete while working on your health education activity. This includes time spent on each step of the nursing process. You should plan to spend two hours assessing and diagnosing, three hours planning, and one hour each implementing, evaluating, and reflecting. Your log likely won’t be broken down into such neat pieces, but we strongly encourage you to record the time as you complete it. If you spend 1.5 hours planning one night, and then another 1.5 hours planning another night, please record them separately.

 

TIME LOG
Date
Hours
Activity
Where does this activity fit into the nursing process?
How does this activity connect to the course objectives?
Date
Hours
Activity
Where does this fit into the nursing process?
How does this activity connect to the course objectives?
Date
Hours
Activity
Where does this activity fit into the nursing process?
How does this activity connect to the course objectives?
Date
Hours
Activity
Where does this activity fit into the nursing process?
How does this activity connect to the course objectives?
Date
Hours
Activity
Where does this activity fit into the nursing process?
How does this activity connect to the course objectives?

Milestone One-Draft of Community Characteristics

Running head: General Community Characteristics 1

 

General Community Characteristics 2

Pressure Ulcers and the Vulnerable Elderly Population

General Community Characteristics

New York City has five predominantly recognized boroughs demographically. Manhattan is amongst the most densely populated city whereby it is a recognized district with historical origin, culturally identified, economically stable and equipped with different health care centers. Manhattan being a coextensive district in NYC, it receives over 30 million visitors per year, though most of the tourists hardly see away from the “22.6 square miles (58.5 square km)” of Manhattan Island, the smallest urban district. Manhattan is easily recognized by residents and visitors since it is divided alluring 220 east-west streets and 12 north-south avenues. It is overloaded with places of enduring interests, cultural institutions and one of the world largest skyscraper. Sachs (2016) states that other neighbouring cities recognizes Manhattan as the primary borough hub for business, center for administrative services, and a financial center for metropolis and their origin of their renown. Inside this considerable historic disparity, Manhattan is mainly made out of neighborhoods that give tranquil sanctuaries to satisfied occupants. No region of NY exhibits dynamism and transformation as ultimately as Manhattan. Crowds enter it day by day to look for their prosperities, and extra millions come to wonder about their endeavors. It is Manhattan that they name an “incredible place, yet I wouldn’t have any desire to live there.”

Demographic and Socioeconomic Characteristics

Manhattan is one of the highly densely populated district in NYC, though smallest geographically. In the United States, NYC is the leading county with highest population and the leading densely populated region globally (Stanhope & Lancaster, 2018). This facts is supported by the 2010 census report that the district has the highest population compared to other boroughs because it holds a populace of “1,585,873 living in a land area of 22.96 square miles (59.5 km2), or 69,464 residents per square mile (26,924/km²)” (U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts). It is the wealthiest county that stabilize U.S economy with a 2005 per capita income above $100,000. Manhattan is the smallest in land area but the third –largest populated borough in NYC.

United States has referred Manhattan as the center that does well economically and culturally develop. NYC serves as the monetary capital center for both NASDAQ as well as the New York Stock Exchange, with an estimated GDP of over $1.2 trillion. Universities, museums, tourist’s attractions sites are amongst the famous landmarks that distinguish Manhattan community from other boroughs. United Nations Headquarters are as well located in this borough. The city is described as a metropolitan center where most of the government business are conducted, businesses, simulation activities as well as where national banks can be accessed.

Key Community Groups and Health Concerns

In Manhattan city, some people are more vulnerable than others. Specifically, elderly and children are mostly affected since according to U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts 16.1% and 9% of elderly and children respectively live in abject poverty. That is why, in Mary Manning Walsh Nursing Home, they strive to identify this portion to understand their level of vulnerability so as to provide appropriate interventions. According to Stanhope & Lancaster (2018), limited and uneven distribution of resources in the community is the leading causes of subjecting these populations to vulnerability. Aging population need prompt intervention to alleviate life-threating effects like developing depression which leads to pressure ulcers. The hospital contends that, to increase resilience, the situation can be reversed when accessible resources are allocated properly. Poverty maybe as result of low income amongst the elderly, which later contribute to their poor health like developing pressure ulcers due to stress and also lack of accessing quality healthcare system. As indicated from the county health statistics, elderly population without insurance coverage in Manhattan city is estimated as 10% which is higher than Hampshire city which has an average of 10%. This is why; Sachs (2016) argues that, Individuals at the two closures of the age difference are frequently less ready to adjust to stressors physiologically”. Kids in poverty are likewise an extraordinary concern of society. An investigation of Stanhope & Lancaster (2018) expressed that the “rate of kid destitution is an expanding function of the level of salary imbalance”. Likewise, “the higher is the pay disparity, the more prominent is the rate of kid poverty.

Children are another vulnerable group predisposed to malnourishment, underweight and poor health. Vulnerability contributes to loss of lifespan work opportunities and shortfall of quality education (Stanhope & Lancaster, 2018). Report from county ranks states that compared to other neighbouring borough; Manhattan carries a 36% of children in who are eligible to get reduced-price lunch. Also, 3% consist of uninsured children and 40% is the mortality. Generally, medical attendants play significant roles in coordinating and connecting vulnerable population with the accessible resources in the community and different organizations. They can work with others as well as offering health education in the public to establish a wellbeing program. Most importantly, medical attendants can impact enactment and health policies that influence the susceptible populace.

References

U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: New York County (Manhattan Borough), New York. Retrieved from: https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/map/newyorkcountymanhattanboroughnewyork/INC110217

Sachs, J. D. (2016). High US child poverty: Explanations and solutions. Academic pediatrics16(3), S8-S12.

Stanhope, M., & Lancaster, J. (2018). Foundations for population health in Community/

public health nursing (5th edition). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.

Milestone Two-Draft of Community Assessment Sample Paper

Running head: COMMUNITY HEALTH ASSESSMENT 1

 

Community Health Assessment 5

Pressure Ulcers and the Vulnerable Elderly Population

Community Health Assessment

Community Health Assessment

Introduction

Community needs evaluation is the process of collecting and analyzing public health information using both quantitative and qualitative approaches for a specific population. This discussion will focus on health information about the elderly population with pressure ulcers by concentrating on the public resources available, social health drivers, risk factors, quality of life, as well as how Mary Manning Walsh hospital provides essential services to this population.

Manhattan Borough, New York City

With a promise to give the most astounding quality medical care service to each individual in all the five boroughs in New York City, the NYC Health + Hospitals public healthcare sector is the biggest of its sort in the US (Efraim, 2010). Citizens of Manhattan district get public medical care service from clinics run by NYC. Pressure ulcers (PU) prevalence presents a substantial weight on medical care facilities. Improved therapeutic care and better living conditions have expanded the future of the old populace. Many aging victims experience the ill effects of severe and ceaseless infections, dietary inadequacies, and susceptibility (Issel & Wells, 2017). A major predisposing factor for PU is comorbidities notwithstanding the aging process bringing about idleness. The number of PU victims over the age of 80 years has been increasing due to prolonged life expectancy, leading to higher risk of disability and immobility. Higher mortality rate reported in Manhattan is a result of PU conditions (Barnidge et al., 2013). Another study shows, an average elderly person with stage IV hospital-acquired PU spends an average of $129,248 (Jaul & Menzel, 2014). A review done on repetitive admissions, an average of $124,327 is spent on community-procured PU. The higher appearance of complications and the extended time taken for patients in the facility to heal increases the health cost as the ulcer grade continues to develop. Intricacies, for example, contaminations or osteomyelitis, increase related financial expense altogether.

Existing Resources

Some of the available national, regional and local resources found in Manhattan borough to help in battling elderly pressure ulcer are:

Educational institutions

Regional and local community leaders

Federally funded Health Care Centers

Regional Public Health Networks

Local & regional hospitals

Department of Health and Human Services

State & local police departments

Granite State Independent Living

Strengths and weaknesses

A notable shortcoming that may be a hindrance with executing a public wellbeing program on pressure ulcers is the absence of familiarity as well as knowledge with the etiology of the pressure ulcer development, particularly at the community setting. Non-proficient care providers and the primary group have a significant responsibility in prevention. Immobile patients receiving care at home are checked and followed up by nurses and GP to check the underlying signs of the skin to effectively plan proper interventions and medications needed (Issel & Wells, 2017). Occasional training and continuous coherence of training are significant for the primary group, caregiver, and the family. Another shortcoming around community contribution is absent. There is an absence of unity in this community. Strength in the community is improved care delivery on teaching and by avoiding outside pressure, shearing forces, and enhancing the dietary condition of the older just as regard for care and avoiding dampness of the skin.

Opportunities

There is a prospect for community-based associations to make an establishment essential for improving quality medicinal services. The obligation is set on the local setting, such, officials, and public members, to help with building up a productive plan. The possibility to diminish the wellbeing inconsistencies identified with stress-related illnesses is realistic with a focused on project and crafted by the public as a whole. A few vacant structures in the district offer space that could be used to make a counseling therapy unit. The chance to build up an active community wellbeing plan is conceivable.

Barriers

Numerous obstructions can meddle with the fruitful execution of a community wellbeing plan. Perhaps the most significant obstacle for the vulnerable populace in this borough is the geological area. Treatment for pressure ulcers incorporates routine caregiver visits related to regular doses of medicine. Inaccessibility of care means the patient will not receive effective therapy. Availability to treatment centers is frequently restricted; this is highlighted in rural regions. The four other boroughs in NY have numerous therapy hospitals, yet Manhattan has rare treatment offices accessible without traveling.

The local problems are only one boundary. Financial difficulties are likewise a boundary to the effective operation of a public wellbeing program. Empowering nearby organizations, communal associates, as well as regional and local administration cooperates to make a plan that is useful to the public will encourage the accomplishment of the program. Accomplices can improve the accessibility of assets and can bolster and perform central assignments (Efraim, 2010). The lower payment level in rural areas than urban centers contributes to a higher experienced poverty rate that directly affects healthcare service delivery.

Conclusion

The higher prevalence of PU among the elderly population has been contributed by the growing number of aging people, as well as coexisting disabilities and comorbidities. Higher immortality and mobilty during hospitalizations is required to prevent this life-threatening ailment. Medical care sectors are feeling the burden of skyrocketing expenses associated with PU management. Awareness and knowledge with preventive perspectives assume a significant function in the counteractive action of PU. Proceeding with instruction with relatives, caregivers, and the therapeutic staff are substantial mechanism employed to counteract and manage PU.

References

Barnidge, E. K., Radvanyi, C., Duggan, K., Motton, F., Wiggs, I., Baker, E. A., & Brownson, R. C. (2013). Understanding and addressing barriers to implementation of environmental and policy interventions to support physical activity and healthy eating in rural communities. The Journal of Rural Health29(1), 97-105.

Efraim, J. A. U. L. (2010). Assessment and management of pressure ulcers in the elderly. Drugs Aging27(4), 311-25.

Issel, L. M., & Wells, R. (2017). Health program planning and evaluation. Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Jaul, E., & Menzel, J. (2014). Pressure ulcers in the elderly, as a public health problem. Journal of General Practice.

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Assignment: Personal Leadership Philosophies

Assignment: Personal Leadership Philosophies

Many of us can think of leaders we have come to admire, be they historical figures, pillars of the industry we work in, or leaders we know personally. The leadership of individuals such as Abraham Lincoln and Margaret Thatcher has been studied and discussed repeatedly. However, you may have interacted with leaders you feel demonstrated equally competent leadership without ever having a book written about their approaches.

What makes great leaders great? Every leader is different, of course, but one area of commonality is the leadership philosophy that great leaders develop and practice. A leadership philosophy is basically an attitude held by leaders that acts as a guiding principle for their behavior. While formal theories on leadership continue to evolve over time, great leaders seem to adhere to an overarching philosophy that steers their actions.

What is your leadership philosophy? In this Assignment, you will explore what guides your own leadership.

To Prepare:

  • Identify two to three scholarly resources, in addition to this Module’s readings, that evaluate the impact of leadership behaviors in creating healthy work environments.
  • Reflect on the leadership behaviors presented in the three resources that you selected for review.
  • Reflect on your results of the CliftonStrengths Assessment and consider how the results relate to your leadership traits.

The Assignment (2-3 pages):

Personal Leadership Philosophies

Develop and submit a personal leadership philosophy that reflects what you think are characteristics of a good leader. Use the scholarly resources on leadership you selected to support your philosophy statement. Your personal leadership philosophy should include the following:

  • A description of your core values
  • A personal mission/vision statement
  • An analysis of your CliftonStrengths Assessment summarizing the results of your profile
  • A description of two key behaviors that you wish to strengthen
  • A development plan that explains how you plan to improve upon the two key behaviors you selected and an explanation of how you plan to achieve your personal vision. Be specific and provide examples.
  • Be sure to incorporate your colleagues’ feedback on your CliftonStrengths Assessment from this Module’s Discussion 2.

 

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Bayo’s Strengths

Share your strengths

Assignment: Personal Leadership Philosophies

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Bayo – What makes you unique? Go learn more about your top Strengths below.

RANK

 

STRENGTH

1

Responsibility

LEARN MORE

EXECUTING

People who are especially talented in the Responsibility theme take psychological ownership of what they say they will do. They are committed to stable values such as honesty and loyalty.

2

Achiever

LEARN MORE

EXECUTING

People who are especially talented in the Achiever theme have a great deal of stamina and work hard. They take great satisfaction from being busy and productive.

3

Futuristic

LEARN MORE

STRATEGIC THINKING

People who are especially talented in the Futuristic theme are inspired by the future and what could be. They inspire others with their visions of the future.

4

Connectedness

LEARN MORE

RELATIONSHIP BUILDING

People who are especially talented in the Connectedness theme have faith in the links between all things. They believe there are few coincidences and that almost every event has a reason.

5

Learner

LEARN MORE

STRATEGIC THINKING

People who are especially talented in the Learner theme have a great desire to learn and want to continuously improve. In particular, the process of learning, rather than the outcome, excites them.

 

Learning Resources: Assignment: Personal Leadership Philosophies

Required Readings

Marshall, E., & Broome, M. (2017). Transformational leadership in nursing: From expert clinician to influential leader (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Springer.

  • Chapter 1, “Expert Clinician to Transformational Leader in a Complex Health Care Organization: Foundations” (pp. 7–20 ONLY)
  • Chapter 6, “Frameworks for Becoming a Transformational Leader” (pp. 145–170)
  • Chapter 7, “Becoming a Leader: It’s All About You” (pp. 171–194)

Duggan, K., Aisaka, K., Tabak, R. G., Smith, C., Erwin, P., & Brownson, R. C. (2015). Implementing administrative evidence-based practices: Lessons from the field in six local health departments across the United States. BMC Health Services Research, 15(1). doi:10.1186/s12913-015-0891-3. Retrieved from https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12913-015-0891-3

 

Resources for the StrengthsFinder Assessment Tool

Strengths Finder: Gallup. (2018). Retrieved from https://walden.gallup.com

Guidance Document: Student Long Guide

Guidance Document: Short Guide

 

Name: NURS_6053_Module03_Week06_Assignment_Rubric

  Excellent Good Fair Poor
Develop and submit a personal leadership philosophy that reflects what you think are characteristics of a good leader. Use the scholarly resources on leadership you selected to support your philosophy statement. Your personal leadership philosophy should include the following:

·   A description of your core values.
·   A personal mission/vision statement.

14 (14%) – 15 (15%)

The response accurately and thoroughly describes in detail a set of core values.

The response accurately and completely describes in detail a personal mission/vision statement.

12 (12%) – 13 (13%)

The response describes a set of core values.

The response describes a personal mission/vision statement.

11 (11%) – 11 (11%)

The response describes a set of core values that is vague or inaccurate.

The response describes a personal mission/vision statement that is vague or inaccurate.

0 (0%) – 10 (10%)

The response describes a set of core values that is vague and inaccurate, or is missing.

The response describes a personal mission/vision statement that is vague and inaccurate, or is missing.

·   Analysis of your CliftonStrengths Assessment summarizing the results of your profile.
·   A description of two key behaviors you wish to strengthen.
14 (14%) – 15 (15%)

The response accurately and completely provides an analysis and detailed summary of the CliftonStrengths Assessment.

The response accurately and thoroughly describes in detail two key behaviors to strengthen.

12 (12%) – 13 (13%)

The response accurately provides an analysis and summary of the CliftonStrengths Assessment.

The response describes two key behaviors to strengthen.

11 (11%) – 11 (11%)

The response provides an analysis and summary of the CliftonStrengths Assessment that is vague or inaccurate.

The response describes two key behaviors to strengthen that is vague or inaccurate.

0 (0%) – 10 (10%)

The response provides an analysis and summary of the CliftonStrengths Assessment that is vague and inaccurate, or is missing.

The response describes two key behaviors to strengthen that is vague and inaccurate, or is missing.

·   A development plan that explains how you plan to improve upon the two key behaviors you selected and an explanation of how you plan to achieve your personal vision. Be specific and provide examples. 50 (50%) – 55 (55%)

An accurate, complete, and detailed development plan is provided that thoroughly explains plans to improve upon the two key behaviors selected.

The responses accurately and thoroughly explain in detail plans on how to achieve a personal vision with specific and accurate examples.

The response includes a comprehensive synthesis of information gleaned from sources that fully support how to achieve a personal vision. Integrates 2 or more credible outside sources, in addition to 2 or 3 course-specific resources to fully support the responses provided.

44 (44%) – 49 (49%)

An accurate development plan is provided that explains plans to improve upon the two key behaviors selected.

The responses explain plans on how to achieve a personal vision and may include some specific examples.

The response includes a synthesis of information gleaned from sources that may support how to achieve a personal vision. Integrates 1 credible outside source, in addition to 2 or 3 course-specific resources which may support the responses provided.

39 (39%) – 43 (43%)

A development plan is provided that explains plans to improve upon the two key behaviors selected that is vague or inaccurate.

The responses explain plans on how to achieve a personal vision and may include some examples that are vague or inaccurate.

The response includes information gleaned from 2 or 3 sources that may support how to achieve a personal vision.

0 (0%) – 38 (38%)

A development plan is provided that explains plans to improve upon the two key behaviors selected that is vague and inaccurate, or is missing.

The responses explain plans on how to achieve a personal vision that is vague and inaccurate, does not include any examples, or is missing.

The response does not include any additional information gleaned from outside sources, or is missing.

Written Expression and Formatting – Paragraph Development and Organization:

Paragraphs make clear points that support well-developed ideas, flow logically, and demonstrate continuity of ideas. Sentences are carefully focused—neither long and rambling nor short and lacking substance. A clear and comprehensive purpose statement and introduction is provided which delineates all required criteria.

5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity.

A clear and comprehensive purpose statement, introduction, and conclusion is provided which delineates all required criteria.

4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 80% of the time.

Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment is stated, yet is brief and not descriptive.

3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 60%–79% of the time.

Purpose, introduction, and conclusion of the assignment is vague or off topic.

0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity < 60% of the time.

No purpose statement, introduction, or conclusion was provided.

Written Expression and Formatting – English writing standards:

Correct grammar, mechanics, and proper punctuation

5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Uses correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation with no errors.

4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Contains a few (1 or 2) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors.

3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)

Contains several (3 or 4) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors.

0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Contains many (≥ 5) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors that interfere with the reader’s understanding.

Written Expression and Formatting – The paper follows correct APA format for title page, headings, font, spacing, margins, indentations, page numbers, parenthetical/in-text citations, and reference list. 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Uses correct APA format with no errors.

4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Contains a few (1 or 2) APA format errors.

3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)

Contains several (3 or 4) APA format errors.

0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Contains many (≥ 5) APA format errors.

Total Points: 100

Name: NURS_6053_Module03_Week06_Assignment_Rubric – Assignment: Personal Leadership Philosophies

 

Assignment: Personal Leadership Philosophies

A leader should have certain qualities to be successful. Several articles describe specific attributes and characteristics a leader should have to promote a healthy work environment (Blake, 2015). My top five themes were Responsibilities, Achiever, Futuristic, Connectedness, and Learner (StrengthsFinder, 2018).

 

My Strengths Finder Assessment

The Achiever theme is when people who are extraordinarily talented in the Achiever theme have a great deal of stamina and work hard. They take great satisfaction from being busy and productive (StrengthsFinder, 2018). The connectedness theme is when people who are extraordinarily talented in the Connectedness theme have faith in the links between all things. They believe there are few coincidences and that almost every event has a reason (StrengthsFinder, 2018). The Futuristic theme is when people who are extraordinarily talented in the Futuristic theme inspired by the future and what could be. They inspire others with their visions of the future (StrengthsFinder, 2018). Responsibility is when people who are extraordinarily talented in the Responsibility theme take psychological ownership of what they say they will do. They are committed to stable values such as honesty and loyalty (StrengthsFinder, 2018). This is when people who are extraordinarily talented in the Learner theme have a great desire to learn and want to improve continuously. In particular, the process of learning, rather than the outcome, excites them. (StrengthsFinder, 2018).

 

Core Values

Core values are the fundamental beliefs of a person, and nurses and nurse leaders need to understand their core values and their professional values as they drive and motivate professional behaviors ((Poorchangizi et al.). My two core values identified in the Strength Finder Assessment are achievers and connectedness. As an individual, when I have a goal, I am determined to reach it. Being an achiever is reflected in my profession as a nurse. When there is an issue or goal to achieve, I work with others to organize and plan in order to be productive. My second core value is connectedness. I collaborate with the nursing team and believe that teamwork and effort will result in the best outcome for patient care. I am mindful of others and think that we all impact and influence each other.

Two Core Value to Strengthen

Successful leadership is always a product of ongoing self-assessment and self-awareness (Marshall & Broome, 2017). The two core values that I would like to strengthen will be futuristic and learner. I chose futuristic because there are times that I find myself working with a problematic coworker who refuses to be a team player. I don’t particularly appreciate working under such a negative atmosphere and will prefer to stay away from such a person when they pose to be complicated. I want to improve on this characteristic in other to see people or situations in a better state than what they are today. As a nurse, I need to strengthen this characteristic to help align and accomplish what needs to be done today to overcome obstacles and achieve a better tomorrow. The second core value to enhance will be a learner. As a nurse, we learn new things daily and interact with patients and other nurses from different cultures and religion. I need to improve my creativity and humor, which falls under the learner theme. Being that I interact with people from different cultures and religions, enhancing my sense of humor will help me in paying keen attention to what I am being taught and seeing things from a different angle. Improving and developing these skills will be beneficial as I continue to grow in my medical profession.

 

Two Characteristic

Two characteristics I would like to strengthen our professional integrity and trust. Trusting individuals that I do not work with on my shift is an obstacle and delegating to them sometimes is challenging. According to Bloom (2019), delegation to coworkers paves the way for effective and efficient leadership skills, as it utilizes others and provides opportunities for growth and improvement. Often, I find myself completing the task because I know that things will be done correctly. As a charge nurse, professional integrity, and trust are skills, and I must continue to assess and strengthen.

Assignment: Personal Leadership Philosophies

 

References:

Blake, N. (2015). The nurse leaderʼs role in supporting healthy work environments. AACN     Advanced Critical Care, 26(3), 201-203. doi:10.1097/nci.0000000000000089.

Bloom, E. (2019). Better Delegation = Better Leadership: A productivity expert provides a roadmap to delegate tasks effectively. Nonprofit World, 37(3), 20–21. Retrieved from https://search-ebscohost-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=138285466&site=eds-live&scope=site

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014). Leadership [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Marshall, E., & Broome, M. (2017). Transformational leadership in nursing: From expert clinician to influential leader. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company.

Poorchangizi, B., Farokhzadian, J., Abbaszadeh,, A., Mirzaee, M., &Borhani, F. (2017).The importance of professional values from clinical nurses’ perspective in hospitals of a medical university in Iran. BioMed Central Medical Ethics18(20).

doi:10.1186/s12910-017-0178-9

Strengths Finder: Gallup. (2019). Retrieved from https://walden.gallup.com

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Benchmark-Theoretical Foundations of Organizational Change

Write a paper of 1,250-1,500 words that explores the theoretical foundations of organizational change. Include the following in your paper:

A discussion that assesses the factors that contribute to the organic evolution of change. (Benchmarks C2.1: Identify and assess the contributing factors in the organic evolution of change.)
A discussion of how to formulate strategic development approaches and to identify models and interventions of change leadership. (Benchmarks C2.2: Formulate strategic development approaches and identify models for change.)
A discussion of the leadership and management skills necessary to implement continuous change models. How do leadership and management integrate to facilitate organizational adaptation? (Benchmarks C2.3: Integrate continuous change models as a component of both leadership and management.)
An evaluation of the leadership and management skills necessary to implement a model of continuous change that facilitates organizational adaptation and ensures follower commitment. (Benchmarks C2.4: Evaluate change models that facilitate organizational adaptation while maintaining a high level of follower commitment.)
A discussion of how to gather and analyze data to determine the most efficacious timing of the change.

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